Village of Nashotah


Click the image to learn more. The Nashotah railway station opened in 1854 and served as an important gateway for individuals heading to the Lake Country for vacation or the Nashotah House to fulfill a religious vocation.

The Village of Nashotah is located about forty miles northwest of MILWAUKEE in WAUKESHA COUNTY’s LAKE COUNTRY. The Village’s name comes from a Native American term meaning “twins.” Nashotah is named for the nearby Upper and Lower Nashotah Lakes, although the lakes themselves are not within the Village. The Village does border Lake Nagawicka and Forest Lake. In addition to the lakes, Nashotah is bordered by the CITY OF DELAFIELD, the TOWN OF MERTON, and the VILLAGE OF CHENEQUA. Incorporated in 1957, Nashotah has traditionally served as a gateway to Lake Country and the Nashotah Mission.[1]

The Watertown Plank Road, which was completed in 1853, began Nashotah’s tenure as a crossroads.[2] In 1848, the Red Circle Inn, Wisconsin’s oldest restaurant, opened at the intersection of the plank road and a wagon road to Delafield.[3] By 1852, the Inn was a stagecoach stop on the plank road.[4] Nashotah became an important stop on the Milwaukee and Watertown Railroad (later part of the CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE, AND ST. PAUL) when it first entered Lake Country.[5] The Nashotah station, originally called the Pine Lake station, opened in 1854.[6] Vacationers using the station to reach local lakes were joined by seminarians and theologians traveling to the Nashotah Mission.[7]

Although not within the village’s municipal boundaries, the Nashotah House Theological Seminary, known as the Nashotah Mission, played an important role in the development of Nashotah. The Mission, an EPISCOPAL, Anglo-Catholic seminary, was dedicated in 1842.[8] The Nashotah Mission, annexed into the City of Delafield in the 1980s, continues to attract visitors to the Nashotah area.[9]

Although it had existed since the mid-nineteenth century, Nashotah was not incorporated until 1957. In the early years, Nashotah’s population remained small. The Village had just 321 residents in 1960 and fewer than 600 residents in 1990.[10] While much of Waukesha County experienced population booms during this period, Nashotah’s low population resulted in low property tax revenue and low involvement in Village affairs. By the 1980s, Nashotah, which had a tradition of volunteer public service, had difficulty finding residents to run for local government office.[11] Subdivisions in the 1990s, however, doubled the town’s population by the year 2000.[12] By 2010, Nashotah had reached 1,395 residents.[13] Because of this late expansion, over half of Nashotah’s residents live in homes built since 1990. The majority of village housing is single-family homes.[14]

Nashotah is home to the headquarters of Dickten Masch Plastics, though the majority of the village land is residential and agricultural. As of 2015, Nashotah had one farm still in operation.[15] The Village is served by the Arrowhead Union High School District’s Lake Country School, located in Hartland.[16] The private Lake Country Christian Academy operated in Nashotah for 37 years before closing in 2015.[17]

Footnotes [+]

  1. ^ Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, The Population of Southeastern Wisconsin, Technical Report No. 11, 5th ed. (Waukesha, WI: Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, 2013), 87; The History of Waukesha County, Wisconsin, Containing an Account of Its Settlement, Growth, Development And Resources; An Extensive And Minute Sketch of Its Cities, Towns and Village—Their Improvements, Industries, Manufactories, Churches, Schools and Societies; Its War Record, Biographical Sketches, Portraits of Prominent Men and Early Settlers; The Whole Preceded by a History Of Wisconsin, Statistics of the State, and an Abstract of Its Laws and Constitution and of the Constitution of the United States (Chicago, IL: Western Historical Company, 1880), Archives Unbound, accessed January 5, 2015, 431.
  2. ^Milwaukee-Watertown Plank Road,” in History of Watertown, Wisconsin: A Digital Online eBook, ed. Ken Riedl ([Watertown, WI]: Watertown Historical Society, 2016), accessed January 13, 2016.
  3. ^ “Red Circle Inn and Bistro,” accessed January 13, 2016, http://www.redcircleinn.com/index.php, information now available at http://redcircleinn.com/, last accessed September 5, 2017; William F. Stark, Pine Lake (Sheboygan, WI: Zimmermann Press, 1984), 144.
  4. ^ William F. Stark, Pine Lake (Sheboygan, WI: Zimmermann Press, 1984), 144.
  5. ^ Map of the Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad and Its Connections, 1857, American Railroad Journal, Rail Road Maps and Plans, Linda Hall Library Digital Collections; The History of Waukesha County, 175.
  6. ^ Stark, Pine Lake, 144.
  7. ^ The History of Waukesha County, 431.
  8. ^ The History of Waukesha County, 440.
  9. ^ “Summit Drops Annexation Suit,” Milwaukee Journal, June 6, 1983; City of Delafield, City of Delafield 2030 Comprehensive Plan (Delafield, WI: Yaggy Colby Associates, 2009), 81.
  10. ^ Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, The Population of Southeastern Wisconsin, Technical Report No. 11, 5th ed. (Waukesha, WI: Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, 2013), 87.
  11. ^ John M. Hostvedt, “Nashotah Plagued by Absence of Growth,” Milwaukee Journal, January 2, 1985, https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=0msaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=HyoEAAAAIBAJ&pg=2351%2C426646.
  12. ^ Village of Nashotah, Waukesha County Department of Parks and Land Use, and Waukesha County University of Wisconsin-Extension, Village of Nashotah Smart Growth Plan, Waukesha County, Wisconsin ([Nashotah, WI]: [The Village], March 18, 2009), 2-3.
  13. ^General Population and Housing Characteristics, Nashotah Village, Wisconsin,” 2010 Census, accessed January 13, 2016.
  14. ^American Fact Finder Selected Housing Characteristics, Nashotah Village, Wisconsin,” American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau, 2014, accessed January 13, 2016.
  15. ^ Kelly Smith, “‘Urban’-Style Development Could Be Coming to Nashotah,” Lake Country Reporter, May 11, 2015, accessed January 13, 2016, http://www.lakecountrynow.com/news/lakecountryreporter/nashotah-farm-land-to-be-preserved-b99496601z1-303083161.html.
  16. ^ Map, “Arrowhead Union High School,” Arrowhead Union High School District website, January 2002, accessed January 13, 2016.
  17. ^ Donna Frake, “Lake Country Christian Academy to Close after 37 Years,” Lake Country Reporter, April 20, 2015, accessed January 14, 2016, http://www.lakecountrynow.com/news/lakecountryreporter/lake-country-christian-academy-to-close-after-37-years-b99484671z1-300671301.html.

For Further Reading

Stark, William F. Pine Lake. Sheboygan, WI: Zimmermann Press, 1984.

The History of Waukesha County, Wisconsin, Containing an Account of Its Settlement, Growth, Development And Resources; An Extensive And Minute Sketch of Its Cities, Towns and Village—Their Improvements, Industries, Manufactories, Churches, Schools and Societies; Its War Record, Biographical Sketches, Portraits of Prominent Men and Early Settlers; The Whole Preceded by a History Of Wisconsin, Statistics of the State, and an Abstract of Its Laws and Constitution and of the Constitution of the United States. Chicago, IL: Western Historical Company, 1880.

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