Saukville


Click the image to learn more. Built in 1848 by William Payne, one of Saukville's first residents, the Payne Hotel still stands near Saukville's downtown area and Triangle Park.

The Saukville area is about 25 miles north of Milwaukee in Ozaukee County.[1] The Saukville area was initially part of the Township of Washington, which is today’s PORT WASHINGTON.[2] Established in 1848, the Township of Saukville contained what became municipalities of the Village of Saukville and the Town of Saukville.[3] The original inhabitants of the area were Menominee. They accepted Sauk refugees from the Green Bay area in the 1730s. The Menominee and Sauk maintained a joint village along the Milwaukee River.[4] Saukville was along the Green Bay Trail, which was renamed Green Bay Road in 1837 after the military made improvements.[5]

Speculators, including SOLOMON JUNEAU and BYRON KILBOURN, began purchasing Saukville land in the 1830s.[6] Most of the speculators never lived in Saukville but instead resold the land for a profit. In 1848 a dam was built north of the contemporary Village of Saukville, allowing the construction of sawmills and gristmills.[7] The Saukville area was connected to larger population centers in 1871, when the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad opened a depot, with trains eventually stopping four times daily.[8]

At least as far back as 1881, Saukville residents unofficially divided the area into a town and a village.[9] The Town contained more land and its residents predominantly practiced farming.[10] By 1927, dairying was the most common form of farming in Saukville.[11] The Village was located along the Milwaukee River and became a small commercial center. Most commercial activity, including a monthly stock fair, took place in Market Square (now called Triangle Park), at the center of the Village.[12] The Village was officially incorporated in 1915 with a vote of 66 in favor and 40 opposed.[13] At that time, the Village of Saukville had a population of 376 people.[14]

After World War Two, Saukville saw dramatic growth in the number of homes.[15] By the late 1960s, developers began drawing up plans for subdivisions and apartments.[16] Between 1970 and 1980, the Village saw population growth of 151%, causing a housing shortage.[17] In the 1980s, the Village of Saukville grew both residentially and economically. The Dekora Woods Business Park, which opened in 1978, is larger than 500 acres.[18]

The Saukville area retains some of its early characteristics. At under four square miles, the Village remains smaller than the Town but contains more people and industry.[19] In 2010, the Village of Saukville had a population of 4,451 people, of whom 96% were white.[20] About half of Village residents live in single family detached homes, while about 25% live in buildings with 3 or more units.[21] The Town of Saukville continues to be more rural than the Village. With an area of 36 square miles, the Town of Saukville had a population of 1,822 people in 2010.[22]

Footnotes [+]

  1. ^ John F. Boatman, Memories from a Rural, Ethnic Community at “the Crossroads”: The Saukville, Wisconsin Area (Milwaukee: University of Wisconsin, 1993), 2.
  2. ^ Boatman, Memories from a Rural, Ethnic Community at “the Crossroads,” 5.
  3. ^ Boatman, Memories from a Rural, Ethnic Community at “the Crossroads,”, 5.
  4. ^ Boatman, Memories from a Rural, Ethnic Community at “the Crossroads,” 7.
  5. ^ Rich Kirchen, “What’s in a Name?” Milwaukee Journal, August 25, 1981, accessed December 21, 2014, http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19810825&id=QKYoAAAAIBAJ&sjid=vykEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3832,2595896.
  6. ^ Boatman, Memories from a Rural, Ethnic Community at “the Crossroads,” 15.
  7. ^ Evelyn Leach, Saukville: The Gem of Ozaukee (Saukville, WI: Saukville Chamber of Commerce, 1976), 6.
  8. ^ Leach, Saukville, 20.
  9. ^ Western Historical Co., History of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, Wisconsin: Containing an Account of Its Settlement, Growth, Development and Resources, ed. Sturges W. Bailey (Chicago, IL: Western Historical Co, 1881), 535-536.
  10. ^ John Goadby Gregory, Southeastern Wisconsin: A History of Old Milwaukee County, vol. 2 (Chicago, IL: S.J. Clarke, 1932), 1185.
  11. ^ Gregory, Southeastern Wisconsin, 1235.
  12. ^ Leach, Saukville, 12, 24.
  13. ^ Leach, Saukville, 27.
  14. ^ Leach, Saukville, 27.
  15. ^ Leach, Saukville, 49.
  16. ^ Leach, Saukville, 51.
  17. ^ Kelly Womer, “Saukville Officials Find Village Image Improving,” The Milwaukee Journal, March 2, 1989, accessed November 19, 2014, http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19890302&id=1zofAAAAIBAJ&sjid=1ysEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5241,1168502; “Community Economic Profile,” Village of Saukville website, accessed December 21, 2014, http://www.ozaukeebusiness.org/CommunityProfiles/Saukville.pdf, information now available at http://www.village.saukville.wi.us/documentcenter/view/31, last accessed September 7, 2017..
  18. ^ City of Port Washington, “Industrial/Business Parks in Ozaukee County Communities: 2006,” City of Port Washington website, accessed January 29, 2015; William Breyfogle, “Saukville Industry Site to Get 6 New Buildings,” Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, August 15, 1997, accessed February 2, 2015, http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1683&dat=19970815&id=GLwaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=JToEAAAAIBAJ&pg=4503,10349655.
  19. ^ US Census Bureau, “US Gazetteer Files”
  20. ^ US Census Bureau, “American Fact Finder,” accessed December 21, 2014, http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF, information now available through https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml, last accessed September 7, 2017.
  21. ^ US Census Bureau, “American Fact Finder,” accessed December 21, 2014, http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF, information now available through https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml, last accessed September 7, 2017.
  22. ^ US Census Bureau, “American Fact Finder,” accessed December 21, 2014, http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF, information now available through https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml, last accessed September 7, 2017; “Community Economic Profile,” accessed December 21, 2014, http://www.ozaukeebusiness.org/CommunityProfiles/TownSaukville.pdf, information now available at http://www.village.saukville.wi.us/documentcenter/view/31, last accessed September 7, 2017.

For Further Reading

Boatman, John F. Memories from a Rural, Ethnic Community at “The Crossroads”: The Saukville, Wisconsin Area. Milwaukee: University of Wisconsin, 1993.

Gregory, John Goadby. Southeastern Wisconsin: A History of Old Milwaukee County. Vol. 2. Chicago, IL: S.J. Clarke, 1932.

Leach, Evelyn. Saukville: The Gem of Ozaukee. Saukville, WI: Saukville Chamber of Commerce, 1976.

Zurawski, Joseph W. Saukville, A Photo History. Saukville, WI: Saukville Area Historical Society, 2003.

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